In this table, we’ve listed the following information:

Location identifier and latitude/longitude

The times in the table have been calculated based on this exact location. Times can shift by several seconds as you get several miles/km away from the location shown.

Eclipse Magnitude

The amount of the Sun's disk that is covered at the time of mid-eclipse. (Measured as a percentage of the Sun's diameter, not area!)

Eclipse Type

Tells you whether the eclipse will be PARTIAL or ANNULAR. If it is only a possibility that some of the eclipse will be seen (due to refraction - see below!) then we've marked this as PARTIAL*.

Notes

Here, we give you one of the following notes to tell you what is most likely to happen given "typical" refraction:

  • All eclipse above horizon
    You should see all of the eclipse!
  • All of annular phase may be visible
    Refraction might be enough to allow you to see all of the annular phase.
  • All of annular phase should be visible
    Refraction should be enough to allow you to see all of the annular phase.
  • Annular phase most likely below horizon
    Refraction will most likely not be enough to allow you to see any of the annular phase.
  • Eclipse almost certainly not visible
    Refraction will most likely not be enough to allow you to see any of the eclipse.
  • Eclipse very unlikely to be visible
    Refraction will probably not be enough to allow you to see any of the eclipse.
  • Good chance to see small amount of eclipse
    Refraction will probably be enough to just barely allow you to see some of the partial phase of the eclipse.
  • Should see very small amount of eclipse
    Refraction should definitely be enough to just barely allow you to see some of the partial phase of the eclipse.
  • Sun may touch horizon during eclipse
    A very special case, where the eclipse will begin with the Sun above the horizon - then the Sun will dip down to the horizon before lifting up again.
  • Sun rises during eclipse
    The Sun should rise during the eclipse, but you will most likely only see the partial phase.
  • Sun rises during eclipse - annular phase may be visible
    The Sun should rise during the eclipse, and refraction might be enough to allow you to see some of the annular phase.
  • Sun will likely rise during annular phase
    The Sun should rise during the eclipse, and refraction should be enough to allow you to see some of the annular phase.
  • Very small chance of seeing some eclipse
    Refraction will probably be enough to allow you to see some of the partial phase of the eclipse.

A word about "Atmospheric Refraction"

Refraction plays a very important role in the 2021 eclipse, because it applies to objects like the Sun and Moon when they are very close to the horizon. The effect serves to make the Sun and Moon appear slightly higher in the sky than they otherwise would. This means they will appear to rise earlier than what the math might suggest. This is normally no big deal, because it happens every day. But when an eclipse is happening while the Sun is rising, it means that you'll be able to see more of the eclipse than the math formulas tell us. But HOW MUCH more of the eclipse?

That's the problem, because the exact amount of refraction depends completely on the temperature and pressure values that exist in the atmosphere that the Sun's light is passing through. These values cannot be predicted in advance, and so we don't know EXACTLY (to the fraction of a second) what time the Sun will appear to rise in any given location! We do know when the eclipse will be happening, but we don't know EXACTLY where the Sun will be (with respect to the horizon) when the important milestones of the eclipse are happening.

We know the usual values for refraction, and we can give pretty good estimates based on what the weather forecasts are. But if you're wanting to know EXACT values and times for sunrise, you're going to be disappointed; sunrise is NEVER predicted to an accuracy at the level of seconds, for just this reason.

In the animation on each city page, we've given you a slider that lets you play with the refraction values. You can leave the slider as is, and this will be an "average" value for refraction that approximates what you most likely will see. Or, you can move the slider left or right to make the refraction values more or less aggressive. This is the best we can do by way of predicting what you'll exactly see.

As a general guide, we can tell you that refraction will increase if the barometric pressure increases, and the refraction will decrease if the temperature goes down. If you're using this tool to plan your eclipse-day activities, you'll want to explore a range of possible values when making your decision as to where to locate yourself on eclipse morning. Part of the fun and excitement of a sunrise or sunset eclipse is not really knowing in advance what you'll see, and knowing that you are enjoying a very unique and special view of the eclipse. We hope you have a wonderful eclipse experience!

All eclipse circumstances have been calculated for each city using that city's latitude and longitude as sourced from public records. Eclipse2024.org has taken all reasonable measures to ensure the accuracy of the latitude and longitude shown; however, the user of any eclipse information on the Eclipse2024.org site should verify that these coordinates are correct for the intended viewing location. You can do this using web tools such as Google, latlong.net, lat-long.com or gps-coordinates.net. Please let us know if you believe the coordinates need to be updated for any city in our database.

We’ve calculated all values in the table below using a value of ΔT=69.35s

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